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Video conferencing

8/21/2014
The goal of the Pathways to Prevention (P2P) program is to host workshops that identify research gaps in a selected scientific area, identify methodological and scientific weaknesses in that scientific area, suggest research needs, and move the field forward through an unbiased, evidence-based assessment of a complex public health issue. P2P workshops are designed for topics that have incomplete or underdeveloped research, difficulty producing a report synthesizing published literature, and are generally not controversial. The first P2P workshop was held in December 2012 at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. The P2P program is strategically located in the NIH Office of Disease Prevention (ODP), which provides the leadership, infrastructure, funding, and coordination necessary to conduct P2P workshops. Previously known as the Evidence-based Methodology Workshop (EbMW) program, the P2P program was renamed in 2013 to better reflect the overarching goal of the program. This program was developed out of a need for a process that (1) could be implemented in approximately a year and (2) addresses topics with methodological weaknesses. A technical brief, which provides an objective description of the state of the science, a summary of ongoing research, and information on research needs, serves as the foundation for each workshop. The technical briefs are prepared by one of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s (AHRQ) Evidence-based Practice Centers.

Air date: 9/30/2014 8:00:00 AM


8/21/2014

The goal of the Pathways to Prevention (P2P) program is to host workshops that identify research gaps in a selected scientific area, identify methodological and scientific weaknesses in that scientific area, suggest research needs, and move the field forward through an unbiased, evidence-based assessment of a complex public health issue. P2P workshops are designed for topics that have incomplete or underdeveloped research, difficulty producing a report synthesizing published literature, and are generally not controversial. The first P2P workshop was held in December 2012 at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. The P2P program is strategically located in the NIH Office of Disease Prevention (ODP), which provides the leadership, infrastructure, funding, and coordination necessary to conduct P2P workshops. Previously known as the Evidence-based Methodology Workshop (EbMW) program, the P2P program was renamed in 2013 to better reflect the overarching goal of the program. This program was developed out of a need for a process that (1) could be implemented in approximately a year and (2) addresses topics with methodological weaknesses. A technical brief, which provides an objective description of the state of the science, a summary of ongoing research, and information on research needs, serves as the foundation for each workshop. The technical briefs are prepared by one of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s (AHRQ) Evidence-based Practice Centers.

Air date: 9/29/2014 8:00:00 AM


8/21/2014

Meeting with travel community to introduce the new CGE travel system.

Air date: 9/4/2014 9:30:00 AM


8/21/2014

Redox Biology

Recent advances in the biochemistry of redox-active species and radicals are beginning to be translated into improvements in prevention and treatment of cancer. Traditionally, reactive species such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with toxicity; however, NO is useful in the treatment of angina and cardiovascular disease. Also, NO is involved in cancer tumor angiogenesis and apoptosis of cancer cells. This course is an overview presenting how redox-active species and radicals are generated; their effects on the cellular and physiological level, how they alter carcinogenesis, angiogenesis and proliferation in animal models of cancer, and how NO alters patient imaging profiles and response to cancer therapy. It consists of two 1-hour lectures with ample time for discussion and analysis. The participation of postdoctoral and clinical fellows interested in redox biology is encouraged.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers/courses/rb

Air date: 10/28/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/21/2014

Redox Biology

Recent advances in the biochemistry of redox-active species and radicals are beginning to be translated into improvements in prevention and treatment of cancer. Traditionally, reactive species such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with toxicity; however, NO is useful in the treatment of angina and cardiovascular disease. Also, NO is involved in cancer tumor angiogenesis and apoptosis of cancer cells. This course is an overview presenting how redox-active species and radicals are generated; their effects on the cellular and physiological level, how they alter carcinogenesis, angiogenesis and proliferation in animal models of cancer, and how NO alters patient imaging profiles and response to cancer therapy. It consists of two 1-hour lectures with ample time for discussion and analysis. The participation of postdoctoral and clinical fellows interested in redox biology is encouraged.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers/courses/rb

Air date: 10/21/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/21/2014

Redox Biology

Recent advances in the biochemistry of redox-active species and radicals are beginning to be translated into improvements in prevention and treatment of cancer. Traditionally, reactive species such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with toxicity; however, NO is useful in the treatment of angina and cardiovascular disease. Also, NO is involved in cancer tumor angiogenesis and apoptosis of cancer cells. This course is an overview presenting how redox-active species and radicals are generated; their effects on the cellular and physiological level, how they alter carcinogenesis, angiogenesis and proliferation in animal models of cancer, and how NO alters patient imaging profiles and response to cancer therapy. It consists of two 1-hour lectures with ample time for discussion and analysis. The participation of postdoctoral and clinical fellows interested in redox biology is encouraged.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers/courses/rb

Air date: 10/14/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/21/2014

Redox Biology

Recent advances in the biochemistry of redox-active species and radicals are beginning to be translated into improvements in prevention and treatment of cancer. Traditionally, reactive species such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with toxicity; however, NO is useful in the treatment of angina and cardiovascular disease. Also, NO is involved in cancer tumor angiogenesis and apoptosis of cancer cells. This course is an overview presenting how redox-active species and radicals are generated; their effects on the cellular and physiological level, how they alter carcinogenesis, angiogenesis and proliferation in animal models of cancer, and how NO alters patient imaging profiles and response to cancer therapy. It consists of two 1-hour lectures with ample time for discussion and analysis. The participation of postdoctoral and clinical fellows interested in redox biology is encouraged.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers/courses/rb

Air date: 10/7/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/21/2014

Redox Biology

Recent advances in the biochemistry of redox-active species and radicals are beginning to be translated into improvements in prevention and treatment of cancer. Traditionally, reactive species such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with toxicity; however, NO is useful in the treatment of angina and cardiovascular disease. Also, NO is involved in cancer tumor angiogenesis and apoptosis of cancer cells. This course is an overview presenting how redox-active species and radicals are generated; their effects on the cellular and physiological level, how they alter carcinogenesis, angiogenesis and proliferation in animal models of cancer, and how NO alters patient imaging profiles and response to cancer therapy. It consists of two 1-hour lectures with ample time for discussion and analysis. The participation of postdoctoral and clinical fellows interested in redox biology is encouraged.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers/courses/rb

Air date: 9/30/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/21/2014

Redox Biology

Recent advances in the biochemistry of redox-active species and radicals are beginning to be translated into improvements in prevention and treatment of cancer. Traditionally, reactive species such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) are associated with toxicity; however, NO is useful in the treatment of angina and cardiovascular disease. Also, NO is involved in cancer tumor angiogenesis and apoptosis of cancer cells. This course is an overview presenting how redox-active species and radicals are generated; their effects on the cellular and physiological level, how they alter carcinogenesis, angiogenesis and proliferation in animal models of cancer, and how NO alters patient imaging profiles and response to cancer therapy. It consists of two 1-hour lectures with ample time for discussion and analysis. The participation of postdoctoral and clinical fellows interested in redox biology is encouraged.

For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/careers/courses/rb

Air date: 9/23/2014 4:00:00 PM


8/20/2014

Dr. Martin J. Blaser will deliver the 2014 Joseph J. Kinyoun Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, October 7, at 3 p.m. in the Lipsett Amphitheater in the NIH Clinical Research Center. Blaser will discuss how the human microbiome influences metabolism, immunity, and disease early in life.

The gastrointestinal tract contains a dense and complex microbial environment, where bacterial and human cells coexist and affect the equilibrium and health of our bodies. This environment forms early in life, and the way in which the assembly occurs influences the body’s metabolism and immune system development. Altering the microbiome during this important period of formation (with antibiotics, for example) may have substantial consequences on the risk of diseases and conditions such as obesity and diabetes.

Blaser is the Muriel and George Singer Professor of Translational Medicine, professor of microbiology, and director of the human microbiome program at the New York University Langone Medical Center. He served as chair of the department of medicine at NYU from 2000 to 2012.

Blaser is a physician and microbiologist whose work during the past 30 years has focused on understanding the interactions of resident bacteria with their human hosts. He recently published Missing Microbes: How the Overuse of Antibiotics Is Fueling Our Modern Plagues. Blaser has advised and mentored numerous students and postdocs and been actively involved in many scientific and professional organizations. He has served as president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, chair of the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors, and chair of the Advisory Board for Clinical Research at NIH. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Kinyoun Lecture series, established in 1979, honors Dr. Joseph J. Kinyoun, who in 1887 founded the Laboratory of Hygiene, the forerunner of NIH, and launched a new era of scientific study of infectious diseases.

Air date: 10/7/2014 3:00:00 PM


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This page last reviewed: December 14, 2010