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1/26/2015
Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

The majority of human pathogenic fungi are soil-dwelling microbes that have no obvious need for animal hosts. This raises a fundamental question in microbial pathogenesis: Why do some of these organisms cause disease in mammals? In this lecture we will dissect the biology of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans in an effort to glean an explanation for the origin of virulence. C. neoformans is an intracellular pathogen with a remarkable replicative strategy that includes the capacity for exciting the host cell without triggering its lysis. This process involves inflicting just enough damage to the host cell to interfere with its microbicidal properties without triggering cell-death pathways such that intracellular replication can proceed unhindered while the host cell remains alive to participate in the exit of fungal cells. The similarity in the interactions between cryptococcal cells with macrophages and amoeba has led to the proposal that the cells' capacity for mammalian virulence emerged accidentally as a result of environmental interactions with phagocytic predators. In this lecture we will also explore the fascinating properties of melanin, an enigmatic pigment that performs a myriad of functions from enhancing cell-wall integrity to energy transduction. We will also consider some of the immunological lessons from studying C. neoformans, which produced important insights into novel antibody protective functions. Finally, we will look at the big picture of fungal pathogenesis and explore the concept of accidental virulence and the likelihood that global warming will bring new fungal diseases.

Air date: 1/28/2015 3:00:00 PM


1/23/2015

CC Grand Rounds: (1) Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: Clinical Manifestations and Therapeutic Approaches and (2) The Biological and Molecular Link between Natalizumab Therapy and Risk of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

For more information go to http://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.html

Air date: 2/25/2015 12:00:00 PM


1/23/2015

CC Grand Rounds: Clinicopathologic Grand Rounds: Clinical Cases from the NIH Clinical Center: Recombinant Anti-CD22 Immunotoxin Therapy of Drug-Resistant Hairy Cell Leukemia: Eradication of Minimal Residual Disease Without Chemotherapy Toxicity

For more information go to http://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.html

Air date: 2/18/2015 12:00:00 PM


1/23/2015

The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) cordially invites you to its winter seminar, featuring Dr. George Hajishengallis. Dr. Hajishengallis is a Professor of Microbiology at Penn Dental Medicine. His field of interest lies at the interface of microbial pathogenesis and immunity, and his work has illuminated important mechanisms of immunopathogenesis of well-adapted pathogens that exploit the human immune system and subvert it to their own advantage. His interests also include the impact of aging on inflammatory diseases.

The GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) was formed to enhance opportunities for discussion of the intersection between the biology of aging and the biology of disease and conditions that are of interest across ICs. It is focused on basic biology, but with a longer view towards translation. If you are interested in learning more, please visit the GSIG web site http://sigs.nih.gov/geroscience/Pages/default.aspx.

Air date: 2/5/2015 12:00:00 PM


1/23/2015

The 8th meeting of the Frederick National Laboratory Advisory Committee (FNLAC)

Air date: 2/3/2015 8:30:00 AM


1/23/2015

The 2015 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 6th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well.

For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov/

Air date: 2/3/2015 4:00:00 PM


1/22/2015

Ethics Rounds: Should We Compensate Subjects for Research Related Injuries?

For more information go to http://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.html

Air date: 2/4/2015 12:00:00 PM


1/21/2015

The Advisory Committee for Research on Women's Health provides advice to the Director, Office of Research on Women's Health at the National Institutes of Health on research activities with respect to women's health issues.

Air date: 10/20/2015 9:00:00 AM


1/21/2015

The Advisory Committee for Research on Women's Health provides advice to the Director, Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on research activities with respect to women's health issues.

Air date: 4/10/2015 9:00:00 AM


1/21/2015

This is the second seminar in the FY2015 DDM Seminar Series. To receive credit for watching the LIVE Videocast, you need to register for the event in LMS on the morning of the event. Archived Videocast registration is also available in LMS approximately 10 days after the event.

This seminar will feature speaker, Bonnie St. John. Ms. St. John is the first African-American to win medals in Winter Paralympic competition as a ski racer, and now she is a motivational speaker who challenges individuals to go above and beyond.

Why be normal when you can be extraordinary? This seminar by inspiring keynote speaker, Bonnie St. John, will give practical tips on how to aim higher than normal. She will share personal stories of excellence and surpassing expectations, as well as provide ways you can rise above when facing difficult situations. Bonnie will also discuss Micro-Resilience, the topic of her recent research and latest book. Micro-Resilience refers to bite-size moments of rejuvenation laced throughout our routine, day-to-day work activities, or intense peak efforts. By focusing on smaller, incremental “resets” throughout the day, our Micro-Resilience techniques offer immediate and intentional activities that combat our natural, physiological, hard-wired tendencies to become hijacked by the stress of continuous transformation at work. Now that’s how you aim higher!

Despite having her right leg amputated at age five, Bonnie St. John became the first African-American ever to win Olympic or Paralympic medals in ski racing, taking home a silver and two bronze medals in downhill events at the 1984 Paralympics in Innsbruck, Austria. In recognition of this historic achievement, Bonnie was quoted on millions of Starbucks cups and was honored at the White House by President George W. Bush. The celebrated author of six books, Bonnie co-authored her most recent #1 bestseller, “How Great Women Lead,” with her teenage daughter, Darcy. NBC Nightly News called Bonnie “One of the five most inspiring women in America.”

For more information go to http://www.ddmseries.od.nih.gov

Air date: 2/12/2015 11:00:00 AM


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This page last reviewed: December 14, 2010